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Maddie, 31, virgo. Maddie loves txf, Elvis, QaF, Animals, Die Ärzte, Sherlock, South Park, Adele, Elijah Wood, Science & so much more that just won't come to mind as yet
I automatically assume people won’t like me, so I don’t talk to them unless they approach me first. I can’t become a part of a crowd because I can’t get past that feeling that I don’t belong.
Stephanie Kuehnert (via durianseeds)
4gifs:

[video]
countrylove87:

h-ella:

fyeahmainer:

motivationintohabit:

I’ve never hit the reblog button so fast in my life.

This dog is 500% done


my favourite part is the second dog that attempts it

countrylove87:

h-ella:

fyeahmainer:

motivationintohabit:

I’ve never hit the reblog button so fast in my life.

This dog is 500% done

my favourite part is the second dog that attempts it

vinceveretts:

Original Caption:

American rock and roll singer Elvis Presley smiles after he is promoted to army sergeant at the U.S. Army Unit’s maneuver headquarters in Grafenwoehr, Germany, Feb. 11, 1960. Presley is promoted to the NCO rank in the 1st Battalion, 32d Armor Regiment, 3d Armored Division.

vinceveretts:

Original Caption:

American rock and roll singer Elvis Presley smiles after he is promoted to army sergeant at the U.S. Army Unit’s maneuver headquarters in Grafenwoehr, Germany, Feb. 11, 1960. Presley is promoted to the NCO rank in the 1st Battalion, 32d Armor Regiment, 3d Armored Division.
mstrkrftz:

Cool Lights by Noppawat Charoensinphon

The saddest things in the world:

-people forgotten on their birthdays
-old people eating alone
-animals left behind by their humans

fluffyplant:

oh my lorde one is a sunset and one is the clouds and one is a sunny meadow wow i need budgies

fluffyplant:

oh my lorde one is a sunset and one is the clouds and one is a sunny meadow wow i need budgies

laekoa:

☮nature, vintage, hippie blog☮ following back similar

laekoa:

☮nature, vintage, hippie blog☮ following back similar

spaceplasma:

One Special Day in the Life of Planet Earth

The cameras on NASA’s Cassini spacecraft captured this rare look at Earth and its moon from Saturn orbit on July 19, 2013. Taken while performing a large wide-angle mosaic of the entire Saturn ring system, narrow-angle camera images were deliberately inserted into the sequence in order to image Earth and its moon. This is the second time that Cassini has imaged Earth from within Saturn’s shadow, and only the third time ever that our planet has been imaged from the outer solar system.

Earth is the blue point of light on the left; the moon is fainter, white, and on the right. Both are seen here through the faint, diffuse E ring of Saturn. Earth was brighter than the estimated brightness used to calculate the narrow-angle camera exposure times. Hence, information derived from the wide-angle camera images was used to process this color composite.

Both Earth and the moon have been increased in brightness for easy visibility; in addition, brightness of the Moon has been increased relative to the Earth, and the brightness of the E ring has been increased as well.

The first image of Earth captured from the outer solar system was taken by NASA’s Voyager 1 in 1990 and famously titled “Pale Blue Dot”. Sixteen years later, in 2006, Cassini imaged the Earth in the stunning and unique mosaic of Saturn called “In Saturn’s Shadow-The Pale Blue Dot”. And, seven years further along, Cassini did it again in a coordinated event that became the first time that Earth’s inhabitants knew in advance that they were being imaged from nearly a billion miles (nearly 1.5 billion kilometers) away. It was the also the first time that Cassini’s highest-resolution camera was employed so that Earth and its moon could be captured as two distinct targets.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI

astronomicalwonders:

The Trifid Nebula - M20
The massive star factory known as the Trifid Nebula was captured in all its glory with the Wide-Field Imager camera attached to the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in northern Chile. The nebula is named after the dark dust bands that trisect its glowing heart, the Trifid Nebula is a rare combination of three nebulae types that reveal the fury of freshly formed stars and point to more star birth in the future.
Credit: ESO/MPG

astronomicalwonders:

The Trifid Nebula - M20

The massive star factory known as the Trifid Nebula was captured in all its glory with the Wide-Field Imager camera attached to the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in northern Chile. The nebula is named after the dark dust bands that trisect its glowing heart, the Trifid Nebula is a rare combination of three nebulae types that reveal the fury of freshly formed stars and point to more star birth in the future.

Credit: ESO/MPG

Anonym
I'm just honestly curious: How extensively does the German school system teach the students about the Holocaust? I've heard differing statements saying that either they teach everything about the Holocaust or that they just simply "gloss" over it. Which is true?

germannn:

The first one for sure!

Of course it depends a little on your school form, the particular school itself, your teachers and everything. So it’s possible that for whatever reasons some students only “gloss” over it, but I think usually it’s pretty much the opposite. WWII and the Holocaust are always on the official syllabus in history class at least.

This is my personal experience:

The first time I was confronted with WWII and anti-Semitism in class was in elementary school. I don’t think we learned any details about the Holocaust because that might have been too traumatizing for kids of that age, but I can remember how we learned that Jews were excluded from society, how they were oppressed, and so on.

After elementary school I attended a German “Gymnasium”. There are several school forms in Germany, the system is too complicated to explain. But a Gymnasium is basically the “highest” high school form. No bragging intended. It’s just that students have to deal with a lot of subjects in more detail there. 

The first book we ever read in German class was actually “Damals war es Friedrich”. It’s about a friendship between two German boys (one of them is Jewish) during the 3rd Reich. That’s how they slowly started to approach the topic with us.

And from that point on the 3rd Reich and the Holocaust always stayed with us. In German class we read countless texts referring to these topics. “If you don’t understand a poem, say it’s about the Nazis or the Holocaust and there’s a 80% chance it’ll be right.” That’s one of the main “mottos” among German students because it’s true.

We discussed parts of the 3rd Reich and the Holocaust at least once a year in history class. We discussed the Nazis’ position regarding art in art class, including “entartete Kunst” (“degenerate art”) and what happened to it. We discussed National Socialism and the Holocaust several times in religion class. It came up in language classes, it was everywhere. Especially in the last ~4 years of school.

I think it’s good that way and super important! But on some days it could happen that there was at least one reference to WWII or the Holocaust in every single one of our lessons. It was simply too much occasionally and even though we knew it was a crucial topic, it could become “annoying” from time to time.

Some students also visit former concentration camps on field day. I didn’t, but we were visited by Holocaust survivors who were sort of “touring” from German school to German school and told their stories.

Again, this is only my personal experience, but I’ve heard the same from many other Gymnasium students who went to different schools in different federal states. Maybe it has changed a little bit in the last few years, though I’m pretty sure that it’s still one of the main topics in most schools.

In 10th grade my class visited a concentration camp. They showed us a video of all the things that happened there and a lot of us got sick watching it. I still remember the silence. Everyone was whispering and in a state of disbelief.

here-in-the-room:

huffingtonpost:

IKEA ADVERTISES ADOPTABLE DOGS IN STORES, BECAUSE EVERY HOME NEEDS A RESCUE PUP

The idea to display the pets inside the store started in Singapore as a collaboration between Ikea and two animal shelters, according to Business Insider. Together they formed the project Home for Hope.

Watch the full video and also learn which state in the United States will be adopting pet displays in their Ikea stores here. 

this actually broke my heart a little bit and i cried what has the internet done to me wait no i just FUCKING LOVE DOGS SO MUCH

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